• Tue, Sep 4 2012

Wondering Why A Woman Would Vote For Mitt Romney, Madeleine Albright? Just Ask.

As the Democratic National Convention kicks into high gear tonight with Michelle Obama’s big speech to the delegates in Charlotte, another prominent political woman has just made a forceful statement of her own. In an interview yesterday with the Huffington Post, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright said, “I can’t understand why any woman would want to vote for Mitt Romney, except maybe Mrs. Romney.” Not this again.

The “Why don’t all women vote Democrat?” line is an old trope among people who haven’t spoken to a Republican in decades. Here are just a few examples from recent months:

And how, here’s Albright:

I’m not sure I’m going to state this exactly right. … But I think there are some who believe they are actually protecting women, you know, and that it is better for women to be taken care of. I think women want to take care of themselves, and I think having a voice in how that is done is very important. And frankly, I don’t understand — I mean, I’m obviously a card-carrying Democrat — but I can’t understand why any woman would want to vote for Mitt Romney, except maybe Mrs. Romney.

It’s true that women are likelier to identify as Democrats than men are. And President Obama leads significantly in polls among women in swing states. But there’s not a straight line between that fact and the assumption that any woman would have to be crazy or self-hating to vote Republican.

Take the abortion issue, offered by many as a signature issue this election season (though neither Romney or Obama seem as eager to discuss it as some of their advocates are). Overall, just about as many women as men identify as pro-choice. Rick Santorum, considerably more conservative than Romney on social issues like abortion, consistently found a higher level of support among women than men when he was running in the Republican primary.

“I can tell you why he does well with me, because he’s strong on family values and he’s very religious,” one 45-year-old voter told the New York Times about Santorum this spring. “I think that this country needs to have a renewal of its moral compass, and this is the man to do it.”

Now that Romney has inherited the Republican mantle, there are millions of anti-choice women who feel the same way about him. And it’s not just social issues that concern women, despite the fact that the “War on Women” has been framed almost exclusively in those terms: There’s unemployment, immigration, education, foreign policy, and the general role of government in our lives. Do we really have to spell this out?

Millions of women are going to vote for Mitt Romney in November, and they’ll have practically millions of reasons for doing so. Just ask Nicki Minaj. (OK, OK, she probably wasn’t being literal when she outed herself in a song as a Romney voter.) The fact that Albright can’t figure any of these reasons out indicates more about the bubble she operates in than the Republican Party or the women who support it.

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  • R.D.

    What’s at stake for me, as a woman, is my financial future. Abortion is a non-issue. (And really, I feel like it shouldn’t be a political issue at all. Don’t like it? Don’t have one.) To that end, I will be voting for Romney. Because the fiscal health of our country trumps pretty much all else.

    • mm

      Abortion is a political issue because it’s at stake. I see where you’re coming from with “don’t like it, don’t have one”, the problem is that there might not even be the OPTION for one with Republicans in charge. There should be a choice, hence the terms pro-choice vs. pro-life. Pro-life obviously doesn’t include choice. They want there to be NO abortions. Maybe it’s because the body shuts down when the rape is legitimate, I don’t know (sarcasm.) My point is, I refuse to vote for anyone who believes or is backed by people who don’t think abortion should be legal.

    • becksss

      Control over the bodies of half of the American population is most defnitely a political issue.

    • becksss

      In fact, this article puts it pretty neatly: http://jezebel.com/5940740/its-time-to-stop-pretending-abortion-and-birth-control-arent-economic-issues

      “Abortion, birth control, and women’s health issues are a distraction from serious, economic issues? How is this a thing that grown ass adults can say with a straight face? If you’re a woman in America, nothing is more tied to your economic health than whether or not you have to feed and clothe another human being. Babies are expensive. Pregnancy and child rearing are hard work that fall disproportionately on women. And anyone who doesn’t understand that is either Romney-rich or suffering from an unfortunate case of Duggar-itis.”

  • R.D.

    What’s at stake for me, as a woman, is my financial future. Abortion is a non-issue. (And really, I feel like it shouldn’t be a political issue at all. Don’t like it? Don’t have one.) To that end, I will be voting for Romney. Because the fiscal health of our country trumps pretty much all else.

    • mm

      Abortion is a political issue because it’s at stake. I see where you’re coming from with “don’t like it, don’t have one”, the problem is that there might not even be the OPTION for one with Republicans in charge. There should be a choice, hence the terms pro-choice vs. pro-life. Pro-life obviously doesn’t include choice. They want there to be NO abortions. Maybe it’s because the body shuts down when the rape is legitimate, I don’t know (sarcasm.) My point is, I refuse to vote for anyone who believes or is backed by people who don’t think abortion should be legal.

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/David-Robb/100001377143776 David Robb

      What will you sayt when you have to stand in judgement before GOD?

    • becksss

      Control over the bodies of half of the American population is most defnitely a political issue.

    • becksss

      In fact, this article puts it pretty neatly: http://jezebel.com/5940740/its-time-to-stop-pretending-abortion-and-birth-control-arent-economic-issues

      “Abortion, birth control, and women’s health issues are a distraction from serious, economic issues? How is this a thing that grown ass adults can say with a straight face? If you’re a woman in America, nothing is more tied to your economic health than whether or not you have to feed and clothe another human being. Babies are expensive. Pregnancy and child rearing are hard work that fall disproportionately on women. And anyone who doesn’t understand that is either Romney-rich or suffering from an unfortunate case of Duggar-itis.”

  • Lastango

    A few thoughts:
    == Albright is a partisan, and her job is to help polarize the electorate. We shouldn’t think for a minute that people like Albright don’t “get it”.
    == There really is a bubble, but IMO it’s found mostly among journalists. Every person they know is a liberal. For a northeast writer, a trip to the southern states is still considered a safari into a strange land inhabited by dangerous, armed primatives.
    == Democrats work hard to conceal the fact that there is a sharp divide between married women and single women. A poll reported on in April found that 56% of married women said they would vote for Romney, vs. 37% for Obama. This has long been the case; for instance, when McCain lost to Obama, McCain carried 53% of the married women’s vote vs. 47% for Obama.
    The reason for this split is simple: large numbers of single women are receivers of federal government handouts. They vote for the party most likely to keep the cash flowing and to grant them new entitlements — like free daycare. Married women have something to protect, and do not fancy the idea of being looted in perpetuity by a vast, growing, permanent dependency class. Married women do not by an large think they should be subsidizing unmarried women’s mistakes and lifestyle choices.

    • MeghanM

      This is an incredible offensive comment. I didn’t realize that married women were funding my wild crazy single lifestyle. My 6-figure salary just means nothing according to you… Because I am a clearly part of the inherent dependency class of single women?

      I support Democrats because I support equal pay for equal work aka Lilly Ledbetter Act. And freedom to make my own reproductive choices , which means no reproduction. And violence against women act. I could go on.

      Wow. I really cannot believe how appalling this comment is.

    • Lastango

      I can appreciate your thinly-contrived outrage. Your tribe isn’t used to getting called out — especially around here.
      Fortunately, I have a really thick skin when it comes to grievance-culture, special-interest advocates claiming offense. That’s what they DO.

    • MeghanM

      Thinly contrived outrage? You essentially stated that single women vote democrat because they rely on the government for handouts. Which is incredibly offensive.

      Funny enough, most of my married female friends have similar political allegiances to my own and our interests are quite aligned. The republicans of my friends tend to be single men.

    • Lastango

      “Funny enough, most of my married female friends have similar political allegiances to my own and our interests are quite aligned.”
      ======
      Heh.. I never doubted that for a minute!

  • Lastango

    A few thoughts:
    == Albright is a partisan, and her job is to help polarize the electorate. We shouldn’t think for a minute that people like Albright don’t “get it”.
    == There really is a bubble, but IMO it’s found mostly among journalists. Every person they know is a liberal. For a northeast writer, a trip to the southern states is still considered a safari into a strange land inhabited by dangerous, armed primatives.
    == Democrats work hard to conceal the fact that there is a sharp divide between married women and single women. A poll reported on in April found that 56% of married women said they would vote for Romney, vs. 37% for Obama. This has long been the case; for instance, when McCain lost to Obama, McCain carried 53% of the married women’s vote vs. 47% for Obama.
    The reason for this split is simple: large numbers of single women are receivers of federal government handouts. They vote for the party most likely to keep the cash flowing and to grant them new entitlements — like free daycare. Married women have something to protect, and do not fancy the idea of being looted in perpetuity by a vast, growing, permanent dependency class. Married women do not by an large think they should be subsidizing unmarried women’s mistakes and lifestyle choices.

    • MeghanM

      This is an incredible offensive comment. I didn’t realize that married women were funding my wild crazy single lifestyle. My 6-figure salary just means nothing according to you… Because I am a clearly part of the inherent dependency class of single women?

      I support Democrats because I support equal pay for equal work aka Lilly Ledbetter Act. And freedom to make my own reproductive choices , which means no reproduction. And violence against women act. I could go on.

      Wow. I really cannot believe how appalling this comment is.

    • Lastango

      I can appreciate your thinly-contrived outrage. Your tribe isn’t used to getting called out — especially around here.
      Fortunately, I have a really thick skin when it comes to grievance-culture, special-interest advocates claiming offense. That’s what they DO.

    • MeghanM

      Thinly contrived outrage? You essentially stated that single women vote democrat because they rely on the government for handouts. Which is incredibly offensive.

      Funny enough, most of my married female friends have similar political allegiances to my own and our interests are quite aligned. The republicans of my friends tend to be single men.

    • Lastango

      “Funny enough, most of my married female friends have similar political allegiances to my own and our interests are quite aligned.”
      ======
      Heh.. I never doubted that for a minute!