• Fri, Oct 26 2012

Blue Ivy Event Planner Tells Us Beyoncé’s Lawyers Are ‘Terrific People’

Veronica Alexandra wants to set the record straight about her relationship with Beyonce: “There was no lawsuit,” she told me Wednesday. Alexandra seems angry about much of the media coverage of her entanglement with the singer and her husband, Jay-Z, who tried — and failed — to trademark their daughter’s name “Blue Ivy.” That just happened to be the same name Alexandra had given her event-planning business back in 2009.

When I talked with Alexandra in January, just after baby Blue Ivy Carter was born, she was thrilled by the fact that the power couple had happened to choose the same name for their baby as her business. “We came first, and we’re really excited to share something so special with someone who is so special. I’m very excited, and I don’t know what’s going to happen,” she told me then.

About 10 days after the baby’s birth, the couple filed to trademark the name “Blue Ivy,” which put them in conflict with Alexandra. Bey and Jay apparently wanted to launch their own line of baby products under the name. This week, the US Patent and Trademark Office granted Alexandra the right to use “Blue Ivy” for event planning.

Nine months later, Alexandra resents what she calls inaccurate media reports on the trademark decision. But she doesn’t sound angry when it comes to Beyonce and Jay-Z themselves, who she calls her “soul mate couple” on her website. When I ask whether she’s had any direct contact with the couple or their team, she says, “I’ve worked hand in hand with her lawyers, and they’re incredible. They’re terrific people so far. They’ve been very supportive and understanding. If anything, they’ve been helpful.”

She says she’s likely gotten some extra business from her company’s now-famous name, though she adds that anyone who’s paying attention will realize she’s not connected to the Carter family. She thinks the trademark battle has ultimately been a good thing for the business. “This whole thing made me fast-forward,” she says. “I had to think about what I was going to trademark.”

Not only did the situation force her to think long-term about her business, it gave her yet another moment in the spotlight. “When the trademark came along, it magnified our name, and gained us a bunch of publicity,” she says. “It’s been a positive reaction.”

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