Topic: ageism

Five Quotes That Will Make You Love Connie Britton More Than You Already Do

Five Quotes That Will Make You Love Connie Britton More Than You Already Do

If you have watched Friday Night Lights and/or Nashville, you do not need a primer on why Connie Britton is the best. She plays characters who are strong, confident, warm, charismatic, and smart, and is, I have always imagined, all of these things herself. A fantastic new profile of Britton in the New York Times magazine proves it, and includes some true gems of wisdom on Britton’s unorthodox and brilliant career, which has only become stronger since she turned 40, defying Hollywood stereotypes. Connie, if you’re reading this, please become my best friend and mentor. More »

RIP: The Hardest-Working Woman At Playboy

RIP: The Hardest-Working Woman At Playboy

Women who work for Playboy are not exactly known for their long shelf life: Hotties at 21 are notties by 30 in the men’s magazine’s oh-so-enlightened view. That’s what makes Mary O’Connor‘s career so fascinating. She was the one woman Hugh Hefner kept around for decade after decade, until death. Nope, not his wife. His secretary. More »

Is Long Hair Bad For Your Career?

Is Long Hair Bad For Your Career?

When we are little girls, many of us dream of having long, beautiful hair. It probably has to do with the fact that princesses always seem to have the longest hair. But eventually we grow up and develop personalities and realize our hair doesn’t totally represent us. It is merely an accessory that happens to grow out of our head. But can the way you wear your hair, specifically if you wear it very long, hurt your career?

In the book Nice Girls Don’t Get The Corner Office there is a theory that long hair can be detrimental to your career. First of all, long hair can easily look unprofessional if you don’t put a lot of time into it. It needs to be brushed perfectly so it doesn’t look like you just stepped off the hippie commune and straight into your office. This is why many women who wear their long, wear it up at work so it is out of their face and they don’t have to worry about it. But another reason long hair can be bad is because it affects your body language, which we all know, can make a huge impact. More »

Oldest Woman In Congress: ‘I Would Not Be Running For Office If I Was About To Die.’

Oldest Woman In Congress: 'I Would Not Be Running For Office If I Was About To Die.'

At 82, New Yorker Louise Slaughter is the oldest woman in Congress, and she’s tough as nails. About two weeks ago she fell and shattered her left thigh while crossing the street in New York. Now she’s beginning her next campaign in a wheelchair. “I would not be running for office if I was about to die,” she announced at a press conference outside the hospital. “I never start something I don’t intend to finish.” More »

In The Business World, Is Gray Hair Really The New Black?

In The Business World, Is Gray Hair Really The New Black?

When it comes to hair color, gray is in style — or so say the experts. Prominent women young and old are sporting gray these days: Christine Lagarde (head of the IMF), Kelly Osbourne and other “young trendsetters,” and even Miranda Priestley (OK, she’s fictional). As a new AP story puts it, there’s “a new type of gray panther, a woman who aspires to do well and get ahead on the job while happily maintaining a full head of gray.” We’ve heard the fashion world and media announce that gray hair is chic before. But is it really true for average working women?
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The Golden Globes Marked A Great Career Moment For Women Over 40

The Golden Globes Marked A Great Career Moment For Women Over 40

As Tina Fey wrote, in her great New Yorker essay about motherhood, Hollywood, and the cusp of 40, “Thirty-five turns into 40 faster than McDonald’s food turns into cold non-food.”  It’s not exactly a secret that Hollywood honors and praises youth and that once you hit a certain age, the roles become limited. But at last night’s Golden Globe ceremony, you wouldn’t have known this as it was the “old” women of Hollywood that took home the awards. Huffington Post editor Emma Gray pointed that last year’s Golden Globes were dominated by discussion of performances by younger stars like Natalie Portman (Black Swan), Anne Hathaway (Love & Other Drugs), Emma Stone (Easy A) and Jennifer Lawrence (Winter’s Bone), this year there was hardly a 20-something in sight, with the exception of Rooney Mara. “And it’s especially heartening that these mid-life actresses are being recognized for substantial roles,” wrote Grey. More »