Topic: negotiations

Why You Need To Talk About Money During Your Job Interview

Why You Need To Talk About Money During Your Job Interview

I might have mentioned before that I have very few interview rules I follow. Personally, I think that interviewers vary, companies vary, and it’s more about reading and responding to your audience than following a list of do’s and dont’s. So I always take lists of what to ask, what not to ask, what to mention and what not to mention with a huge ol’ grain of sea salt. But there’s one supposedly forbidden topic that I think interviewees should be confident discussing from the beginning of the job search process. More »

Bullish: How To Ask For More Money, Part I

Bullish: How To Ask For More Money, Part I

There’s a lot of advice out there about negotiating for raises. Do it, and do it often; keep records of your accomplishments so you can make your case. Please, dear god, make sure your sentences don’t come out sounding like questions. (I need a raise? I am a valuable member of the team?)

Here’s the Harvard Business Review on How to Negotiate Your Next Salary. From HBR, among other suggestions: Do your research on what the company pays others and what other companies pay for your role. (I have long advocated salary openness – see Bullish: How Talking About Money Can Make You More of It.)

But I think that a lot of the decisions and communications that determine how much money you make just don’t always happen in a formal negotiating meeting, in which you know in advance that you will be discussing your salary and that you should come prepared. More »

Poll: Do You Use Salary Negotiation Strategy Tips From The Grindstone?

Poll: Do You Use Salary Negotiation Strategy Tips From The Grindstone?

Women are often told that if their salaries are lower than they should be — lower than a man’s, that is — that they need to negotiate more effectively. That was the premise of the groundbreaking 2003 book Women Don’t Ask, which argued that the gender wage gap could be explained by women’s failure to advocate for themselves in the workplace, particularly during salary negotiations, and it has become a staple of career advice since then. Most articles about this subject have headlines like: “‘They Don’t Negotiate’: Why Young Women College Graduates Are Still Paid Less Than Men,” “Why Women Don’t Negotiate,” “Ask for a Rase? Most Women Hesitate,” “Women Don’t Negotiate for Themselves.” And on and on. We get it. More »

What Businesswomen Can Learn From The Payroll Tax Cut Extension Debate

What Businesswomen Can Learn From The Payroll Tax Cut Extension Debate

I think we’re all pretty tired of hearing about the payroll tax cut extension. We’re ready to move past this odd GOP fiasco and start focusing on more important matters, like a fat jolly man whose supposed to be delivering presents to the children of the Earth in just a day and a half. The votes have made, the gavels have been struck. Call this a done deal, at least for two months. Then we can have this awesome fight all over again! At least we’ll have something to look forward to, right?

But we shouldn’t put this political mess behind us quite yet, although I have a feeling that a certain Speaker of the House would like us to. There are some valuable business lessons in this very obvious Republican misstep. More »

8 Tips To Help You Negotiate For A Better End-Of-The-Year Bonus

8 Tips To Help You Negotiate For A Better End-Of-The-Year Bonus

U.S. companies are expected to offer more perks to their employees this holiday season – including bonuses – in another sign the economy is slowly improving, according to a new survey from CareerBuilder.com. About 40% of employers plan to give holiday bonuses this year, up from 33% last year, with the majority planning to give the same amount as last year. This means it is time for you to brush up on your negotiation skills. As you may have heard, women are often criticized for their abilities in this area. More »

Leaning To The Left May Get You A Lower Raise

Leaning To The Left May Get You A Lower Raise

Next time you ask your boss for a raise be sure to lean right. According to new research, body posture affects decision-making, and people who physically lean to the left are more likely to underestimate figures. Researchers found that covertly manipulating the tilt of the body influences people’s estimates of sizes, numbers and percentages. And because the research only held up when respondents were assessing an unknown number, it was accepted to be applicable for gauging expected and desired salaries, according to a report by the Association for Psychological Science. “Be careful to stand upright next time your boss asks you how much you should be paid. If you are leaning to the left you will be putting a lower value on your worth,” the APS said in a report. More »