Topic: starbucks

The Rise Of Corporate Colleges

The Rise Of Corporate Colleges

Each year, McDonalds managers and would-be managers numbering in the thousands spend a week at Hamburger University to take classes in business and strategic management.

That’s right. There’s a brick-and-mortar “college” at the chain’s Illinois headquarters, and courses employees take there can be used toward an associate’s or a bachelor’s degree. More »

The Patriotism Of Starbucks: How One Businessman Is Shaping Politics

The Patriotism Of Starbucks: How One Businessman Is Shaping Politics

If you’re opening a national newspaper this morning, there’s a chance that you just might see a certain Starbucks advertisement that’s a little different than the rest. It’s really not an advertisement for any product, though the company’s CEO paid for the space. It’s a letter about the future of America.

Howard Schultz, Starbucks’ CEO, is issuing a call-to-arms for businessmen in this country to stop playing partisan politics and start doing what’s necessary to move this country forward. More »

American Workers Care More About Buying Coffee Than Gas

American Workers Care More About Buying Coffee Than Gas

Now that’s a lot of caffeine. According to Accounting Principals’ latest Workonomix survey, the average American worker is paying  more than $20 a week on coffee, for a yearly average of $1,092. Whereas commuting costs for the average worker come out to around $1,476 per year. And when you consider the volume of your typical coffee drink versus a gallon of gasoline, it looks like we place a higher value on our caffeine fix than we do on the 87 octane in our gas tanks. A Starbucks latte is delicious but it won’t get you very far on a thruway. More »

10 Businesses That Used Flawed Logic And Changed Their Industries Forever

10 Businesses That Used Flawed Logic And Changed Their Industries Forever

In the new film Moneyball, released nationwide today, Brad Pitt plays ,Billy Beane, the General Manager of the Oakland Athletics who broke ground when he used engineered statistics to remain competitive in the majors while working with an inferior payroll. The basic premise is that so-called baseball experts had long been using statistics that weren’t actually all that valuable in measuring the success of players, and even more so in scouting young prospects.

The New York Times bestseller by Michael Lewis that the film is based on, got lots of people who weren’t even interested in baseball interested in the Moneyball concept. People began applying the model to other fields, from other pro sports to financial markets and beyond. Let’s look at some other businesses that used what was considered to be flawed logic or at least some very unique logic and changed the way we look at certain industries forever. More »